July 30, 2014

Revenge of the Dolphin: If you’re a mother or a ned or a drunken student in Aberdeen this is for you

Dolphin

Dolphin

This is one of 50 dolphins around Aberdeen, all different and painted by a host of artists as part of Wild in Art sculptures to raise money for children’s charities.

However not all has gone to plan as you will discover if you click on the link below which will take you to a Facebook page.

Warning: ripe language. Enjoy. :)

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10154387022460181&set=vb.1439171969697637&type=2&theater

 

July 26, 2014

I-i-i-n-n-n-d-d-d-e-e-p-p-e-e-n-n-d aaah! Separation – a reply to John McTernan in Prospect Magazine

I’m more amused than captivated by the views on Scottish independence of people who don’t live here. Lots of celebrities have spoken up on one side or the other although I suspect they know more about the intricacies of astrophysics than they do about Scotland.

John McTernan likes to air his opinion on the referendum. Don’t know if he counts as a celeb but, like them, I doubt he’s got his finger on Scotland’s pulse but he thinks he does and so feels entitled to record his impressions in Prospect Magazine 24 July 2104 in an article entitled ‘Why Patriotic Scots will be voting No.’

Aberdeen

I suppose the response to that is some will and some won’t. Then again never fully trust anyone who evokes ‘patriotism’ as a justification for preserving Scotland as a subjugated region within a UK that is inevitably dominated by its much larger neighbour. Not even when that person refers to the nationalist Hugh MacDiarmid to  demonstrate just how much he LOVES us.  Just what is it you LOVE about Scotland John? and all those celebs who are clueless about the place.

John McTernan sticks to  #naw’s  standard terminology – ‘separation’ never independence possibly because they know that independence is positive and progressive and worth aiming for. But no, it’s as if they can’t quite get their tongues round the term ‘independence’ – i-i-i-n-n-n-d-d-d-e-e-ppppppppppppppp – no can’t do it – separation – that’s a whole lot easier – more negative, bad vibes, scareyyyyyyyy.

Actually John it’s not separation at all: not physically and not politically – it is independence – there’s a world of difference. By not daring to engage with the term you fail. They all fail.

John McTernan is right to say the numbers supporting independence have been relatively stable over the years but something has changed here though possibly looking from the outside he wouldn’t recognise it.  What’s changed is that more people are not just quite enthusiastic about Scotland taking responsibility for itself – pursuing policies which chime with the different mindset there is here to England’s – but also because there’s an opportunity to see the long cherished hope realised .

I’m one of those. I never used to care much about independence and I don’t know what changed me, perhaps studying History at University where I came to realise that Scotland’s position in  world affairs was rarely acknowledged – as part of the UK Scotland is invisible both within and outwith these islands. The UK is too often solely England but never solely Scotland. It’s not as though anything has changed. Yes the media have discovered Scotland and for the past year or so we’ve been bombarded with Scotland this and Scotland that but it is all part of the #bettertogether smokescreen aimed at persuading voters into believing we are fully integrated part of the UK. It will all vanish like snow off a dyke after the referendum and everyone will return to normal with Scotland shut back into its box.

John asks ‘why’? Why go for independence.  He asks it with reference to the Scottish Enlightenment – as in Hume and Smith asked ‘why’ a lot in their pursuance of enlightenment so it is reasonable to apply the same approach to the referendum. And yes it is.

But in John McTernan’s citing of Hume, a giant of the Enlightenment, he takes no cognisance that this giant of a thinker was flawed as a man, as in his disagreement with Beattie over the issue of slavery.

When Beattie asked why slavery? Hume responded along the lines of why not? Why not because black people, in his view, were not quite human so he couldn’t see Beattie’s difficulty with the issue.

So, John when you ask why ? – realise the answer may not be what you expect. It is a reasonable question but only if you’re open to the response why not?  What you are saying is really why bother?

My response is that a Yes vote resulting in Scotland regaining its independence will be better for Scotland in every aspect of Scottish life – politically, socially, economically, culturally, for our health and for our well-being AND – of equal importance perhaps that  other places will benefit as well.  Why? Because in Scotland it is inevitable there will be support for a more socially democratic regime than we get/expect from future UK governments where austerity and private capital is the driver.

Privatisation has all but eradicated the NHS in England. This is the consequence of England voting for conservative policies from Tories, Lib Dems, and Labour. All of them support this drive towards the market that is so damaging to the once sacrosanct publicly run health care system that put people before profits and spreadsheets. That this hasn’t happened in Scotland speaks volumes. Support for the above parties has fallen here because there’s no appetite for their rightwing policies – for the pursuit of austerity at any cost, for adopting the market at the expense of public safeguards.

John weakens his case when citing Gordon Brown for the man once highly regarded in this country no longer holds the nations’ respect: he is the voice of rightwing social democracy happy to go along with illegal wars and unrestrained capital.  Under Brown and Blair the spivs got richer and economic inequality increased. Where is the equality involved in illegal wars supported by Brown and Blair? Where is the equality in the doubling of the 10% tax rate for the poorest in the UK? Where is the equality in the introduction of the bedroom tax? That’s what we got and will get with Labour. Never mind the soundbites this is the reality of electing UK Labour in the future. A change in government will give us what we have now with knobs on. Brown wanted to free capital and see where that’s landed us. Labour relies on our short-term memories and a compliant media. Scots have long memories, John.

‘The United Kingdom is a massive engine for redistribution and social justice. We tax the wealth of London, a great world city, and distribute it across the country.’

The idea that London’s wealth is redistributed around the country is certainly quixotic. According to John McTernan London is supporting the rest of the country which is strange because to the rest of us London is a pampered and subsidised parasite that is hugely damaging to the economic and cultural life of those regions and countries making up the rest of the UK.

Astronomic sums are spent in London. Compare the funding it gets in all manner of ways compared to what is spent elsewhere.  Suggesting London’s wealth filters down to the rest of us is bogus even quixotic and certainly claptrap.

Why should Scotland NOT regain its independence? It is logical for a country that is marginalised by its size in this uneven and unequal Union to want to advance itself: to get the government its people chooses that will allow it to broaden and build its economic base and fund social policies that are in tune with the majority of its population.

No-one is  saying everything will be great from day one. But the mistakes Scotland make will be ones of our own making and the solutions will be too.  We want nothing to do with your austerity cuts shouldered by the poor that are inflicted on us by Tories and Lib Dems with Labour lurking in the background thumping its fist asking ‘how hard do you want it?’

If Yes supporters gloss over potential hurdles then No voters are equally glib – desperately erecting hurdles more ludicrous by the day. There is never acknowledgement that aspects of Scottish life could be improved through independence. By overstating their case No voters show themselves to be petty-minded, vindictive, carping, sniping, ungenerous and yes, dishonest.

McTernan’s nasty little aside in his summing up is an example of this abusive and bullying behaviour that the UK media is happy to ignore while frothing at the mouth whenever a supporter of Yes goes too far.

Scotland doesn’t need to be patronised. It doesn’t need London’s cash. It doesn’t need the reactionary politics that are becoming so harmful in England. Scotland needs to move forward into the future with confidence. We have the means to become hugely successful participants on the world stage. Our people have made great things happen all over the globe there’s no reason we can’t do the same for ourselves. Anything less makes no sense whatsoever.

July 22, 2014

What happens when a Palestinian youth looks for his family in a bombed house in Gaza

A Palestinian youth looks for relatives in the rubble that was their home. But there is no pity in Gaza.

Shooting unarmed civilians is a war crime. Some countries and individuals however are above the law.

Warning: violence

And his family find him: New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/23/world/middleeast/palestinian-family-finds-missing-son-in-youtube-video-of-his-shooting.html?smid=tw-NYTOpenSource&seid=auto&_r=0

Tags: , ,
July 19, 2014

The land where the white thistles grow

 

Cirsium vulgare

Cirsium vulgare

One day a year or two back a local farmer stopped me with a wave of his hand and a smile.

‘You’re the woman that takes photographs,’ he said.

I could hardly deny it as my camera was dangling from my fingers.

‘I’ve been trying to speak to you for ages,’ he added, ‘have you ever seen a white thistle?’

I squinted at him and shook my head then remembered having noticed white multi-headed thistles which I now know are Cirsium arvense.

Cirsium arvense creeping thistle

Cirsium arvense creeping thistle

‘No,’ came his dismissive reply, ‘the proper thistles, the big anes, I have them growing over there,’ and he pointed to the track leading to his house.

As it happened it was late in the season and there were none for me to see but I vowed to check them out the following year and capture the unusual blooms with my camera. In the meantime I urged my friendly farmer to get in touch with someone, anyone – perhaps at the university – who might know about white thistles.

The farmer was Leslie Angus and he was keen to share his most unusual thistles with the world but he was a busy man with better things to do with his time.

As luck would have it the following summer none of the white thistles flowered so I had to content myself photographing the common but pretty purple ones. The year after that I was chatting to Mr Angus and mentioned that they hadn’t flowered again but he put me right – they had but in a different site and as I hadn’t been out so often during the poor summer our paths hadn’t crossed and I had missed another opportunity to see them.

This summer things were very different. The weather was lovely and the conditions for walking were benign.

Mr Angus met me one day in a state of excitement. ‘I was hoping to catch you, they’re flowering.’

He led me into one of his parks and we made our way past a herd of curious cattle to the place where the white thistles grow.

They were magnificent. He hadn’t imagined them nor had he been pulling my leg. There they were; bold, striking and very, very white.

white thistles Aberdeenshire

white thistles Aberdeenshire

I took a few pictures and went home to investigate incidences of white thistles but then I happened to glance at a restaurant review in a local newspaper and was astonished at one of life’s coincidences; a photograph of a table arrangement included a single white thistle. On closer inspection it didn’t look quite right. I phoned the restaurant and its bemused owner informed me his thistles were indeed artificial.

Artificial white thistles seem to be quite popular; they are used as buttonholes for weddings as any glance at Google images will confirm. It so happens that Carole, Mr Angus’ daughter, has her own florist business and this summer one lucky groom actually sported a genuine white thistle in his buttonhole at his wedding.

White thistles do exist.  The aforementioned Cirsium arvense frequently display white blooms and worldwide different varieties of thistle include several whites but they are rare among Cirsium vulgare, the spear thistle – the one we see at roadsides and around edges of fields.

Thistles in the wrong place can be the bane of farmers’ lives. They are tenacious once they get into the soil and a pest to weed out.  Not that Mr Angus minds. He appreciates their exquisite rarity. While the purples are grand the spectacle of one or two whites among them makes them even more special.

Escutcheon of Gordon Fencibles

The thistle has been Scotland’s flower emblem for nearly 1000 years from the reign of Alexander III when its jabbiness was supposed to have caused barefoot Norse invaders so much pain when they trod on them they cried out and alerted the Scottish guard. The thistle became the symbol of the House of Stuart, the oldest Scottish chivalric medal is the Order of the Thistle and where would Scottish regiments be without a thistle to decorate their bonnets? The plant has given its name to sports clubs and is the motif for a host of organisations and businesses including the Encyclopaedia Britannica, the Carnegie Mellon University and the Perelman School of Medicine, Pennsylvania in recognition of their Scottish roots.

white thistle, Aberdeenshire

Scotland’s national flower is the thistle but which one is a moot point. Some say it is the aforementioned Cirsium vulgare while others declare it Onopordum acanthium, the woolly or cotton thistle, but there are doubts over how long that species has grown in Scotland. The same caution applies to Carduus lanceolatus and what of the dwarf thistle Cirsium acaule or the musk thistle Carduus nutans? How about the melancholy thistle Cirsium heterophyllum or Carduus benedictus, Lady’s Thistle?  Carlina vulgaris is a member of the same family and has pale flowers but it hardly fits the bill. The list of thistles goes on and really whichever was the original emblem doesn’t matter too much. There are possibly as many opinions on the flower that represents Scotland as there are thistles varieties.

In his reflective epic poem, A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle, Hugh MacDiarmid’s Scotland is the thistle whichever one he had in mind – ‘The thistle’s like mysel’ and so the object of his musings on the state of Scotland:-

The thistle rises and forever will,

Getherin’ the generations under’t.

This is the monument o’ a’ they were,

And a’ they hoped and wondered.

Thistles grow thick and fast in this country and despite their designation as weeds they have traditionally proved useful as fodder for animals when chopped up although they are not grazed by them which is just as well or I might never have got to see those white ones in Mr Angus’ cattle park.  Bees and insects love them for their nectar; Mr Angus has noticed that in mixed clumps of purple and white thistles bees are especially attracted to the white ones.  Once flowering is past and seeds have set on those silky filaments green and gold finches move in to devour the tiny seeds.  And we should not forget that the thistle has been used in herbal medicine, possibly for as long as plants and people have lived side-by-side.

Pliny recommended thistles as a remedy for baldness and bad breath and as an effective carminative but he mentioned only purple ones so we may infer from this that whites were as rare as hen’s teeth in 1st century Rome as they are in 21st century Scotland. Culpeper in his Complete Herbal however does mention white thistles – but cotton ones which as we know do produce white heads more readily.

Go into any pharmacy or health store and you will find milk thistle, silybum marianum, extract offered as an effective remedy for constipation and for strengthening the liver. Its use was banned by the Olympic committee – for athletes and not spectators I am assuming.  Thistle is an ingredient in several contemporary medicines. It is said to be an antidote to Deathcap and Fly Agaric fungi poisoning.  Thistle down was once used by the poor to stuff pillows which suggest there used to be many more thistles around in medieval Scotland than there are now.

Time to consult the experts. Dr Heather McHaffie of the Scottish Botanic Garden in Edinburgh has never come across a white spear thistle but compares incidences of whites to an albino ‘without the pink eyes!’ Such a shame. White spear thistles are rare and very attractive but just imagine them with pink eyes.  They’d be queuing up at Mr Angus’ gate.

Cirsium vulgare

Professor Ian Alexander of Aberdeen University has seen whites in both Cirsium vulgare and the more common Cirsium arvense, the creeping thistle. This latter thistle, as its name suggests, spreads vegetatively by rhizomes and that is perhaps why white flowers are so much more common among them. He explained that where a white plant sets seed – the result of cross-pollination from different flowers – then more white thistles could populate the area.  This would fit in with Mr Angus’ experience of the thistles growing in the same spot, although not necessarily producing white flowers every year.  Mr Angus suspected the white form originated from a garden variety stocked in a former near-by nursery but as Professor Alexander said, cross pollination will produce the white form from time to time – Dr McHaffie’s albinos minus pink eyes.

While we might venerate the thistle on the one hand its incidence as a weed condemns it on the other. Saskatchewan in Canada is atypical in that there the plant is encouraged for its medicinal properties and value as animal food but the bonnie Cirsium vulgare is included in the Global Invasive Species Database making it a persecuted plant. However I would imagine that there are people who would love to provide a corner of their garden for that rare beauty the white spear thistle.

 

Lorna Dey (first published Leopard Magazine November/December 2013)

July 19, 2014

The Better Together #Vote No #No Thanks #Naw Movie

Just thought I’d provide a platform for Better Together so we can fully grasp what they stand for.

July 16, 2014

The Coalition Government Colouring and Activity Book

Originally posted on Pride's Purge:

(satire?)

Here are some sample pages from the forthcoming Coalition Government Colouring and Activity Book I’m currently working on:

cameron coloringesther cabinet meetinghomeless spikesduncan smith wordsearchDaily Mail hate pageiain duncan smith coloring2lib-dem-spinelessnick clegg spot the differencesad boy no toysvince lost balls

Educational and fun at the same time, the book will be published at cost price just in time for Christmas so will make a perfect stocking filler for your loved ones to enjoy hours of endless fun using it in the lead up to the next election.

.

Please feel free to comment. And share. Thanks:

View original

July 14, 2014

This is today’s UK so don’t tell me we’re better together

Voting yes gives us a chance to establish a different way of approaching society’s problems so that life isn’t made easier for the wealthy and harder for the poor.

July 10, 2014

Vote No and we lose our free NHS in Scotland: leading surgeon speaks out

July 9, 2014

Build around not through and we can have Marischal Square

Aberdeen City Council is totally wrong in its outrageously misleading development of Broad Street – initially bandied around as the formation of a civic square fronting Marischal College.

There is no doubt the spec for the development was drawn up entirely with commercialisation in mind and the public consultation was the usual tokenistic gesture politics for surely there never was any intention to modify economic  priorities  with anything as prosaic as public opinion.  

It is clear that while Aberdeen City Council is happy to provide a blank sheet for the creation of shops, offices, parking  and a hotel it is less interested (uninterested) in what the people of the city want.

Of course councils ignoring peoples’ wishes is hardly a new phenomenon but it is disappointing when it occurs without even the suggestion of any sop to popular opinion.

Contrary to what the Labour group says there is nothing, absolutely nothing in this design to attract people into the city. On the other hand a large photogenic square would most definitely become a tourist attraction as well as a potential hub for local people.  Think of what social media could do to spread images of Aberdeen’s fine civic square with the backdrop of the magnificent Marischal College. Wouldn’t that enhance the attractiveness of Aberdeen?

This development used to be referred to as Marischal Square. Now there is NO SQUARE – instead there is a bog-standard street to be built – and not even a broad one despite being on Broad Street.

But there is a compromise that the council should grasp.

Create a square, or rectangle, from the old St Nix to Upper Kirkgate and along the Flourmill Lane, preserving Provost Skene’s House, with commercial properties. Instead of building over the whole area buildings would surround it. This would result in an open public space facing Marischal College. Such a space would enhance the attractiveness of any hotel fronting an open area instead of into a narrow street.

Surely it is time for the council to listen to its critics over this debacle. It’s not so long ago several of its members were very vocally critical over the awful proposals for Union Terrace Gardens but this is as bad and here we find the Labour group are poachers turned gamekeepers.

You are wrong Jenny Laing, you are wrong Willie Young  – Aberdeen Civic Society and the thousands of people who provided you with their sensible views are correct. In fact you should both be thoroughly ashamed of your small-minded approach to what is a unique opportunity to lay down a real legacy for the city. It speaks volumes that you can’t see this.

Shops, offices, hotel in green. Marischal Square in orange.

Shops, offices, hotel in green. Marischal Square in orange.

 

http://lenathehyena.wordpress.com/2014/05/21/the-marischal-odeon-or-gone-with-the-wind-a-muse-and-council-joint-production

http://lenathehyena.wordpress.com/2014/04/07/move-along-now-nothing-to-see-here-aberdeens-latest-civic-square-debacle

http://lenathehyena.wordpress.com/2013/11/09/the-card-square-project-marishchal-goes-phut

June 28, 2014

The Wonderful World of Jodi Le Bigre

 

 

overgrowth

OVERGROWTH

What struck me about this picture at first viewing was the tight composition, the subtle palette and fascinating detail which draws the eye in and around the scene. It looked Japanese; the women’s faces slightly oriental and their costumes exotic and painstakingly depicted.  A finely drawn wooden hull rises out of the water – all bulk and weight and grainy texture.  On board the women are mostly bunched up with a few outliers, one immersed in the water.

I liked the piece immediately I saw it at the Aberdeen Artists Society exhibition in Aberdeen Art Gallery so I thought I’d look at more of the artist’s work.

Feathers%20sq[2]

Jodi Le Bigre’s approach is truly fascinating. Take the oil on wood, Feathers – it is an amazing painting soft and multi-faceted and coloured from a restricted her palette. The birds’ feathers are as sensuous as any 18th century fabric in say a Ramsay painting. In a humorous aside a bird in the botton right corner gazes at its own reflection in a stone or something shiny.

Looking through her website the variety of Jodi’s approaches become apparent.  Just as she’s lived in different parts of the world – her native Canada, France, Japan and now Scotland so she’s been absorbing ideas and motifs from all manner of influences. It was in Paris that she learned printing which she’s used to great effect in Overgrowth.

A%20Lonesome%20Place%20(w)[1]

In her oil, A Lonesome Place another of her fascinations is demonstrated – medieval life and imagery. Here she has created a frieze-like effect with the line of blue-faced people ranged in front of four idealised trees while in the foreground there are exotic and monster birds along with a fleshy woman exposing her leg and her ghost-like companion to her right. I’ve no idea what’s going on in the picture but it is fairly surreal and the more you look into it the spookier it becomes. The overgrown bird reminded me of Max Ernst’s fantastic and threatening species partly human.

overgrowthdetail2

Let’s take a closer look at Overgrowth, Jodi’s etching in black and sepia inks with touches of watercolour. The meticulous detailing that’s gone into the different costumes and effects in the water – hugely time-consuming and wholly worth it in the quality of the piece. The women share the same face, seen from different angles – pensive and guarded they consider their predicament.

If you look at the image at the start of this blog you can make out one or two strange green figures wrapped in ivy which I think allude to Jodi’s view that we become who we are by absorbing all sorts of influences from our environment  including the natural world we pass through in life.  In the picture ivy grows up around the boat, trapping it and some of the women within its tendrils – is this the overgrowth?

In Jodi’s own blog she  includes a poem by Aberdeen’s makar Sheena Blackhall on Overgrowth.

Twenty Geishas

Twenty Geishas went to sea
In a vessel of polished pine
The traders’ routes offered to fill their coffers
For sharing virtues free

The Flying Dutchman closed his sails
For the Geishas to step aboard
And what transpired it certainly fired
Their spirits which simply soared

The Marie Celeste, they encountered next
Do you wonder it’s not been found?
With kisses of honey and blandishments sunny
The steersman he ran aground

So if twenty Geishas you should see
When you’re sailing the ocean wide
Don’t let them on deck, your ship they will wreck
Keep hard on the starboard side!

melancholia I

Durer’s Melancholia I

I have always been delighted by illustrations from Grimms Fairy Tales and the like and pictorial references to medieval people, places  and things. I like shape and form and the intricate little details that captivate the eye.

My favourite artist is Albrecht Durer who lived in Nuremberg in the 15th and early 16th centuries.  Durer is the absolute master in precision and fine detailed draughtsmanship. His eye was impeccable. His sense of humour compelling. He was simply the greatest and most complete artist of his genre. His wonderful  engraving of Melancholia I may represent his own feelings of melancholia on the death of his mother. Melancholia’s face is black, signifying black bile – four humours were believed to determine the constitution of any person – sanguine, phlegmatic, choleric and melancholic with the latter associated with creativity. On Melancholia’s head sits a garland of herbs suggesting suffering and headaches which Durer suffered from following his bereavement. It is one of the prints on exhibition currently at Duff House in Aberdeenshire.

Sadly not there is Durer’s painting of a Blue Roller bird.roller bird

This work shows how he meticulously captured the construction and texture of the bird’s feathers. An Italian painter once asked to see the brushes he used for depicting fur and feathers and did not believe Durer when he picked up an ordinary bristle paintbrush.

nurnberg

This scene of Durer’s own city of Nuremberg, a mastery in composition leads us back to Jodi Le Bigre.

La%20Rencontre%20-%20Jodi%20Le%20Bigre[1]

La Rencontre is  a lovely example of her medieval hilltop town which could be anywhere in continental Europe. There are two figures in the foreground collecting branches presumably for fire or building. Behind them is the manmade world of stone town houses and churches and walls as in Durer’s picture the urban landscape occupies the background while around is the natural environment that supplies so much that is necessary for peoples’ existence.

Jodi recognises how we are shaped by our environments. Since coming to live in Aberdeen she has encountered the Doric. Take a look at this.

Lizzie's%20Dother%20-%20Jodi%20Le%20Bigre[1]

Lizzie’s Dother is a sweet, magical watercolour. Lizzie is crouched into the too-small frame provided by the artist for a woman of her bulk and so her skirts fall into creases that flow and bunch and give her form. The sweep of Lizzie’s long hair is repeated in the lines of the bundle that is her dother. And they are surrounded by lilies, symbolising innocence.

I think it reads in Doric along the bottom, She wis mindit o aa the ither quines at she’d held the same wye, which is just brilliant.

communion%20sq[1]

Communion belongs in a book of folk tales and shows Jodi’s undoubted talent to apply herself to so many different styles.  Here an old woman has her back to us as she communes with her geese in front of peasant houses. Notice how the woman’s headscarf echoes the orange and shape of the birds’ beaks.  Again the palette is muted and there is a sublime softness to the piece.

Marginalia%20-%20Jodi%20Le%20Bigre[1]

Marginalia is set in Aberdeen with the Citadel in the background and a Bosch-like clamour of figures occupying the foreground. The city’s iconic bird the seagull are shown harnessed as draught animals. The saved and the damned are separated by a sturdy Aberdeen hoose and oil supply vessels grace the backdrop of the north sea.

Der%20Nikolaus%20-%20Jodi%20Le%20Bigre[1]

A Christmas card – Der Nikolaus - to my mind  shows Santa Claus as Robbie Coltrane.

This drawing of a procession of matryoshka dolls in a scene out the Daphne du Maurier’s The Birds. I don’t begin to understand the juxtaposition between the Russian granny dolls and the contemporary figures in the foreground but it’s fun and notice the third doll turning to gaze up at the gathering  threat of the birds flying overhead.

I suspect the inside of Jodi’s brain is fairly interesting. I’ve not come across another artist who has reduced her figures to such a bare minimum as Jodi does in her composition comprising a group of skeletons oot and aboot including the child waving to us while her or his, it’s impossible to tell, parent is trying to direct the child’s attention to a birdy in the sky.

Here a plague doctor from Renaissance Italy shares space with a walrus, an acrobat and a stilt walker. As I said, the inside of Jodi’s head must be a place of wonder.

Young and brimming with talent Jodi Le Bigre – you can find her website at http://jodilebigre.com

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